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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,950 (some duplicates have been removed)
group that i think some would say an advocate for iran's nuclear policy. can you tell us why you thought it was important >> in iran, i've been advocating for 30 years good relations between iran and the u.s., iran and the west. the problem is the lack of understanding in both sides. americans they do not understand iran. iranians do not understand america. the second major problem is mistrust. but mistrust is mutual. americans and the western countries, they need to understand why iran cannot trust the west. they have their own legitimate reasons. like americans and western countries, they cannot trust iran, iranians also they should understand why. being here i thought maybe that the most important job i can do to write a book on the nuclear issue as far as the nuclear issue is the issue number one. for the u.s. and the international community to present it the way the prospective and point of view of the iranians for american public opinion and politicians. to facilitate a possible peaceful solution for iranian nuclear crisis. >> there are a number of other questions, and you allude t
with doing things here. i want to cover the history of diplomacy and iran in 12 minutes. [laughter] i'm not going to do a with those bags, the history of the world and 5 seconds. it is a very long story that has been going on since 2002 when an iranian resistance group revealed that iran had things going on. in 2003, i started with a october come in 2003, but the investigation started in february of 2003, when a nuclear watchdog flew into tehran. iran is going ahead with its nuclear program. it feels justified, saying its nuclear program is a peaceful effort to generate electricity and that it has an inalienable right to do this. the u.s. position is that iran is secretly seeking to develop nuclear weapons and, under the guidance of the npc, and under the guise of the technology that is the same technology used to make a power reactor, under the guise of that, they're pushing ahead toward a weapon. up until october, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there w
the united states, as well as in europe. so iran -- the iranian people believe this is an important thing, and it's a way of expressing themselves and making publicity about their position, and then mobilizing support. but the judgment comes -- and if it is possible to really see like an x-ray as to what israel is in the minds of people about iran's nuclear weapons ambitions, i would say the way leaked to the -- >> [inaudible] >> not many people -- it's always easier to make a form of statements, you know, until they may not even believe but this is the way in politics, but when the day comes, not many would like iran to have a bomb for reasons that are clear. >> did you know any active scientists that were assassinated in r & d? did you know any of them? >> sure, we followed world -- >> did you personally know any of them? >> oh, no. but would it have been useful >> if i could add one thing. seldom seen, any event, anywhere in the world in which the spin both before and afterwards has been so intense about whether it was a victory for iran, was it a victory for the u.s., was it a
of 20% of iran's call for sanctions, the united states there is a problem that iran to want to negotiate for a position which has changed -- you talk about 20% -- they want sanctions to be lifted with them stopping 20%. the question is they are enriching. we said their right to enrich should be recognized and that would negate all the u.n. sanctions. the nuclear issue stems from u.n. security council issues. within the margins of this issue, there is room to change going forward. i think we may find that it is constrained by the fact that israel is still there. israel is not about to let go of its concerns. i think there has been a lack of dialogue. it would be good if the two sides could sit down together. they could start with this temple and hold discussions and feel of how each side can help each other. my advice for the u.s. diplomats would be to sit with them and say we are not going to talk about the nuclear issue, how is your family. there is the fact of just discussing. on the other side, there is the problem that it is not clear what the endgame is. we're calling on iran to sus
adviser to iranian political figures and an insider on iran's nuclear program claims iran is not building a nuclear bomb, and he recently addressed the commonwealth club of california talking about the iranian nuclear program and a possible israeli strike on the country. this is a little more than an hour. >> good evening. and welcome to today's meeting of the commonwealth club of california, the place where you're in the know. you can find the commonwealth club on the internet at commonwealth club.org. i am phillip yun, executive director of the plowshares fund and your moderator for today's program. this program is also being held in association with the commonwealth club's middle east forum. and now i am pleased to introduce our distinguished speaker, hoe sane mousavian, former policy adviser to the secretary of iran's supreme national security council, visiting research scholar at the woodrow wilson school of public and international affairs at princeton university and author of the iranian nuclear crisis, a memoir. ambassador mousavian's book is the first detailed account from an ira
between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we supported. and i believe that since then, we have been having understanding between us, between moscow and russia, that the really mutually beneficial partnership in the interest of the russian and american people in the interest of international relations given the importance of the two countries can be based on equal, mutually respectful, mutually beneficial relationship. and on that route, we achieved quite a lot. i would be incomplete if i don't mention that there are problems, of course. you mentioned one of them, missile d
, mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran. why he doesn't fear israeli attack, why he feels they would prevail in any war and his surprising apology to the people of new york. also on the show, bain capital. mitt romney's private he can quit firm is no longer so private, it is in the headlines, on the campaign trail, on your tv screen. what is it really all about? steve pagliuca one of those that runs the firm joins me. >>> just when we need it most. what is it? i'll explain. >>> and, finally, candidate barack obama of brazil? but first here's my take. president obama has sewed up the -- surged in the polls this week, and republicans have been quick to figure out the problem. mitt romney. peggy noonan said his rolling campaign has been a calamity. shouldn't it puz puzzle us that romney's campaign is so incompetent, given his reputation for, well, competence. after all he founded one of the leading firms, turned around the salt lake city olympics and was a very successful governor. how did he get so clumsy so fast? in fact, the problem is not romney. but the new republican party, given
the jewish community, we were hearing from iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad. we're awaiting as well to hear from the prime minister of israel, benjamin netanyahu. a lot of folks are talking about this in the political campaign, political climate, wondering who would be the best candidate moving forward. i want to talk about all that with poppy harlow. you had a chance to sit down with jewish voters in new jersey who actually were breaking the ceremony, religious ceremony to speak to you on that hole by day about their feelings about this. what was the overwhelming concern here. >> reporter: we did. it was a fast nighting night. we went to two family's homes in new jersey. some that support president obama, others clearly aligned with mitt romney. a lot comes down to the issue of the red line and where the u.s. should draw a red line when it comes to iran's nuclear program. that was issue number one for them. it certainly matters a lot in their votes. i want to play se sound from the home of carol burau who had a lot of people over for the breakfast last night, talking about the red
or an opportunity to stop iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons. welcome to "america live", everyone, i'm megyn kelly. the prime minister of israel is expected to speak at the united nations any moment now as his nation faces ever increasing threat from iran. prime minister netanyahu is expected to fus on the red lines he says need to be drawn regarding iran's nuclear development. recall he could not reportedly get a meeting weather our president to sit down and discuss these issues but he will have a very big microphone when he appears at the united nations moments from now and we will will all hear what his mayesage is. david lee miller is live at the u.n. for us. david lee? >> reporter: megyn, speaking right now at the united nations is the palestinian president mahmoud abbas. after he speaks we expect one more world leader, the representative from slovonia. in all likelihood benjamin netanyahu will take to the podium. he is here within the building behind me at united nations. he arrived at the united nations 40 minutes ago. reporters asked him when he entered the building what he would say today
and the u.s. have hit a new low over the looming nuclear threat from iran? >> those in the international community that refuse to put red lines before iran don't have a moral right to place a red light before israel. >>> sorting out u.s. options in the middle east, consequences for the region and the political impact in november. our political roundtable. joining us, the first muslim elected to the u.s. congress, democratic representative from minnesota, keith ellison. the chairman of the homeland security committee, new york republican congressman, peter king. author of the new book, "the price of politics," "the washington post's" bob woodward. "the atlantic's" jeffrey goldberg. and nbc's chief foreign affairs goldberg. and nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. relative calm this morning in the middle east after several days of intense anti-american protests raged across many parts of the islamic world. and word this morning that the president obama has ordered evacuation of tunisia and sudan and the p
blair. >> and we conclude with the president of iran, mahmoud ahmadinejad. three perspectives on the middle east, the arab spring and iran when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: new york city this week was the site of two major global conferences, one the united nations general assembly in which representatives of the nations who are members of the general assembly come here, including heads of state and foreign ministers and others at the clinton global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president ha
weapons in making its nuclear program more transparent -- iran from obtaining nuclear weapons and making its nuclear program more transparent. this program runs just over two hours. >> good morning to you all. i am the director of the brazil institute. on behalf of my colleagues, director of the middle east program and director of the international security studies program. i would like to welcome you all. it is nice that you could join us. also joining us is a bigger audience that is following these proceedings on c-span. i need to give you an explanation about absences. they plan to be here, but a very sad and unfortunately -- unfortunate event made them be elsewhere. as we gather here in washington , holly en route or on their way to bloomington, indiana. along with jane harman, joe, and members of our senior staff to attend a memorial service for the life of our former president and ceo who passed away last month under tragic circumstances. nancy was loved dearly. we mourn this extraordinary loss and embrace him and his family in this time of sadness. early last year, holly, brought,
underground nuclear facility. at this late hour there's only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs. that's by placing a clear, red line on iran's nuclear weapons program. [ applause ] red lines don't lead to war. red lines prevent war. just look at nato's charter. it made clear that an attack on one member country would be considered an attack on all. nato's red line helped to keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century. president kennedy selt a red line during the cuban missile crisis. that red line also prevented war and helped preserve the peace for decades. in fact, it's the failure to place red lines that's often invited aggression. if the western powers had drawn clear red lines during the 1930s, i believe they would have stopped nazi aggression and world war ii might have been avoided. in 1990, if saddam hussein had been clearly told that his conquest of kuwait would cross a red line, the first gulf war might have been avoided. clear red lines have also worked with iran. earlier this year iran threatened to close the strait of hormuz. the uni
on the subject of iran's nuclear program. >> translator: we have business that some members of the security council with little rights have chosen silence with regard to the nuclear warheads of the fake regime while at the same time they impede scientific progress of other nations. >> president obama is in new york tonight ahead of his speech on tuesday, a speech that will condemn violent protests in the middle east and underscore his commitment to keep iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. meanwhile, with just 43 days to go until this country's election, mitt romney has campaigned in colorado. the latest national cnn poll has president obama with a four point lead over governor romney against the backdrop of the political race in this country and turmoil in the middle east, it seemed the perfect time to sit down with ahmadinejad at his world hotel for a world exclusive on everything from the political to the personal. mr. president, welcome to new york. many americans see you at public enemy number one. how do you feel about that? >> translator: the creator, the almighty and most gracious
in beirut, to saudi arabia, or even our attack on our embassy in 2008 in yemen. >> or iran in 1979. >> this has happened in the past. so i don't think that we should misunderstand what this is. the reason we provide aid in egypt and lybia is because it serves american interests. >> but our americans are not being served if this is the response. >> it serves our interests to have egypt willing and able to maintain a peace treaty with israel, for egypt to continue to be a strong partner. let's be clear. the government, once president obama called president morsi, immediately in egypt, the security forces came out and have provided very significant protection. same in tunisia, same in libya, same in yemen. and all of these leaders have very forcefully conveyed their condemnation of what had transpired. >> there were conflicting messages from morsi. in arabic, they said protest. in english, they said protect. >> what has happened is that the egyptian government has protected our facilities. our embassy is open today. things are calm. and morsi has repeatedly been clear in his condemnat
has tried sanctions with iran under the leadership of president obama, the international community has passed some ofhe strongest sanctions to date. i wa to thank the governments reenhehave joined in this effort. it's had an effect. oil exports have been curbed, and the iranian economy has been hit hard. it's had an effect on the eco ecy, wust face the truth. sanctions have not stopped iran's nuclear program either. according to the international atomic energy agency, during the st year alone iran has doubled the mber oftresn its underground nuclear facility. at this late hour there's only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomibombs. that'sy pla a clear, red line on iran's nuclear weapons program. [ applause ] re lin'tea to war. red lines prevent war. just look at nato's charter. it made ear that an attack on one membecountry would be considered an aack o all. nato red line heldo k the peace in europe for nearly half a century. president kennedy selt a red lineuring the cuban missile crisis. that red line also prevented war and helped preserve the peace for decas. in fac
of great britain. we conclude this evening with the president of iran, mahmoud ahmadinejad. the conversation with my colleague at cbs norah o'donnell took place at his hotel. there are many things we have to talk about. but i would like to blin with a place in which there-- begin with a place in which there is killing, a place in which you have an interest, and a place in which you can play a positive role, that's syria. what are you prered to do to end the fighting and work out some kind of dialogue with a number of parties? >> in the name of god, its almighty, the merciful, the beneficient, first of all i would like your permission to say hello to everyone watching this program. and i would like to ask the almighty god for health and success for everyone. i am very happy to be talking with you again. and also with the lady. you brought up a good topic. syria right now has a very complicated situation. and there are many factors, in that there are many factors in conflict in syria. some people sell weapons, some encourage-- some dictate who should come who should go, who s
his final one on the world stage. you see, iran's election law says he can't rub again and elections are set for 2013. so i asked him about israeli strikes and obama's warnings. you've indicate thad yd that yo that the israeli prime minister's threats toward iran are ones you don't take very seriously, but i was wondering how seriously you take the rhetoric of the president of the united states. president obama said at the unite ed nations he was determined to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. do you regard that as a bluff? >> translator: you set forth two or three questions here. i have never used the word "bluff." when we say we do not take it seriously, we mean that it impacts -- it does not impact our policies in the slightest. iran is a vast country, is a great country, let's assume a few terrorists come and assassinate some of our officials. will the country be damaged? >> no. a couple of bombs will be set to explode. will the country be destroyed? >> no. we see the ziep of regime at the same level as the bombers and the criminals and the terrorists and even if they
to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> the president has not drawn us further away from the nuke leer round of attack, iran is closer to having a weapon. >> bill: is president obama weak or strong in protecting americans from the iranian nuclear threat? we'll hear both sides so you can decide. >> i want you to remember that the house they were standing in, the house my family has the privilege of living in, that house was built in part by slaves. >> bill: why is the first lady invoking images of slavery to make a point? we will tell you. >> we have a -- (bleep). >> bill: has madonna totally lost it? what the heck she talk being? we'll show you one of the most bizarre displays we've ever seen. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> bill: hi. i'm bill o'reilly. thank you for watching us tonight. is president obama protecting us against the danger from iran? that's the subject of this evening's talking points me mow. the campaign is heating up. the iranian minority ahmadinejab in new york today threatening jews and demeaning gay people. t
in tokyo. iran's president often challenges and chastises western nations in defense of his country's nuclear program. but ahmadinejad's critics argue he's trying to build a bomb by allowing scientists to enrich uranium. but he says he's willing to put a stop to the practice provided other countries fill in the gap. >> reporter: ahmadinejad spoke to nhk in new york where he's scheduled to attend the annual meeting of the u.n. general assembly. he sought to dispel international concern over the possible closure of the strait of hormuz. the main shipping route for middle east oil. >> translator: iran has been maintaining the stability of the strait. we will never pose a threat in its waters. >> reporter: western nations have been demanding iran halt its nuclear project. iran had responded by warning it might close in the persian gulf. about 90% of japan's crude oil imports comes through the narrow channel. iran held a large rally last week. in a speech, ahmadinejad said iran would press ahead with its nuclear program. but the president has to consider the increasingly harsh domestic e
foreign policy chnlz, the threat of a nuclear iran, escalating violence in syria are in focus this week. last year, france played a key role rein libya. i am please to have laurent fabius back at this table. welcome back. >> it is the same table, although a different venue. looking at libya and looking at syria, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a lega
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,950 (some duplicates have been removed)

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